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career as an executive career at the san francisco chronicle, and i stayed in touch with him all those years. going on for years. for all that time, seth was involved in his own personal quest for the question of what was really going on here at berkeley in the 1960s one of those events were taking place. the result is this book, "subversives: the fbi's war on student radicals, and reagan's rise to power". it is an extraordinary book. when i read it, he was written primarily from the perspective of the fbi. a voice we rarely hear in public. it does not sure what to think until we see their documents. some of which we have seen, and some of which you are going to see tonight, and if you have never seen an fbi document, you might close your eyes when you see it. looking in the audience, how many remembered j. edgar hoover? and what was going on. and for 45 minutes. this is -- i realize this book is very heavy. it is 504 pages long of narrative based on document. and get a glance with the daunting process was that seth went through when he was trying to put this together. to give you an i
that shed any understanding whatsoever of the problems that the disadvantaged experienced in san francisco because her at higher screen that she was from a wealthy part of the city. her attire was sending a message that got in her way. >> what are some of the other key differences that winning seek high office space other than men seeking high office? >> there are so many. we were talking about is a little bit at dinnertime, the fact that a woman needs credentials that are the highest caliber, where as as i mentioned earlier, a man you just comes onto the national scene who is perhaps just elected senator can run for president, or be seen as presidential. were as the woman needs foreign affairs experience. you know, she needs to preferably be a governor, and that some of the work barbara lee has done with keys to the governors mentioned, the idea that it wouldn't be acceptable for a woman to just get elected president from a senate position. she would need more than that. the highest level of credential where as we will accept a than a resume from a male candidate because he looks the part
in san francisco because her attire screamed she was from a wealthy part of the city. and her attire was sending a message that got in her way as a public servant. >> what are some of the other key differences women seeking high office face? rather than men seeking high office? >> there are so many. we were talking about this at dinner time that a woman needs credentials of the highest caliber whereas as i mentioned earlier a man who comes to the national scene, just elected senator can run for president or be seen as presidential whereas a woman needs foreign affairs experience, needs preferably to be a governor and that is what barbara lee has done in the governor's mansion, that it wouldn't be acceptable for a woman to get elected president from a senate position. you would need more than that. the highest level of credentials, accept the thinner resume from a male candidate because he looks the part. >> we were talking about this at dinner. a male candidate can appoint a vice presidential running mate to fill in the gap. that experience in foreign policy and you get somebody to t
in san francisco. tuesday october 2nd former connecticut senator chris dodd will be here in his new role as the chairman and ceo of the motion picture association of america. he will address how last technology has moved entertainment content to the cloud it's created economic challenges to both the industry and government protecting the rights of the 2.2 million cremators and makers in every state especially in california. and then three days later, friday october 5th, massachusetts congressman barney frank will be here for a luncheon program. i should tell you chris dodd is a 6 p.m. program also at the club in san francisco. friday october 5th, barney frank will be here for a luncheon program on the of the commonwealth club can you see both dolph and frank in one week. [laughter] congressman frank will be here discussing the domestic and foreign policy issues pertinent to the upcoming election. it is my pleasure to extend a special welcome to any new commonwealth members of this evening. you'll need the most well-informed interesting people in the bay area when you attend the commonwea
at the san francisco chronicle. and all that time -- and i stayed in touch with seth all those years, i've known him for at least 30 year, going on 40 years -- and for all that time almost seth was involved in his own personal quest for the question of what was really going on here at berkeley during the 1960s when all those events were taking place. and the result is this book, "subversives: the fbi's war on student radicals and reagan's rise to power." it's an extraordinary book, and when i read it finally -- and, by the way, i was waiting for years to read it and hearing about it -- it's an extraordinary book because it's written primarily from the perspective of the fbi, a voice that we rarely hear in public and one that when we hear it, we're not sure what to think until we see their documents. and this book is based, as i understand it, on 250,000 documents, some of which i've seen myself and some of which you're going to see tonight. if you've never seen an fbi document, you might be shocked. you might want to close your eyes when you see it. [laughter] it includes, in fact, some
hugging san francisco liberals, progressives. that is who we are talking about in these are people who are interested in not just economic outcomes but also social outcomes so whereas conservatives are interested in talking about drugs and progressives are interested in talking about where the complex off on your french fries and whether not you can have a plastic bag or junk of soda. michael bloomberg, great example of a progressive. he is banning cups in new york city so that is what we are talking about. we are talking about that ideology of the left, the progressive ideology. so what are some myths that are held by today's progressives? we have got about five myths that we tend to focus on the first two because those are the eight juicy ideas, the bad ideas are actually. one is that natural things are good. two, unnatural things are bad. three, i unchecked science will destroy us and four science is only relative anyway and five, science is on our side. the first one, we won't have much time to get into these myths. if you want to get my book you will learn how about them there. we
beast. these are the people who, the typical tree-hugging, san francisco liberals, progressives. that's who we're talking about. these are the people who are interested in not just economic outcomes, but also social outcomes. so whereas conservatives are interested in talking about drugs and sex, progressives are interested in talking about whether or not you can put salt on your french fries and whether or not you can have a plastic bag or drink a soda. michael bloomberg, great example of a progressive. he's banning currents in new york city. that -- cups in new york city. so that's what we're talking about. the eyedology of the left, the progressive ideology. so what are some myths that are commonly held by today's progress i haves? we've got about five myth, but we tend to focus on the first two because those are where the big, juicy ideas, the bad ideas are, actually. one is that natural things are good. two, unnatural things are bad. three, unchecked science will destroy us. four, science is only relative anyway. and, five, science is on our side. okay. the first one -- we actual
his way to san francisco and then decided i miss my family and called them out again only to leave them again and get a master's pregnant again and she had a nervous breakdown comes about was the part my father could not forgive. why did you call less out to san francisco and the book too there's been healing for my father. he wouldn't talk about him so this book suddenly my father's story is out there and i think it's been good for him. the story of forgiveness, the story of the sea, of realizing when they were fighting the storm at the sea it is as the time goes by there is a fisherman but i think these people, the historical piece is a difficult time to read it they barely survived. they were so hard working. they just never gave up. the women would raise their children in a much simpler way. they had gardens, and so i think for me it is the courage and the integrity of these people that we can all learn from. they worked very hard to survive, and a lot of times they lost the men and they still had to carry on and the government was not there to help them so there are a lot of p
and drove away with his mistress and his baby that was just born. and then made his way to san francisco. and he decided, oh, i miss my family come and call them out again, only to leave them again, get the mistress pregnant again and my nana had a nervous breakdown. so that was the part that my father could not forgive. you abandon us once, but why did you call us out to san francisco? my father, i think the book, too, it has been healing for my father. he would never, if someone said ambrose's name, he left the room and would not talk about him. so this book, suddenly, my father's word is out there. i think it has been good for him. >> i think the story of forgiveness, the story of the sea end of realizing that they were fighting a storm at sea. the courage and the time gone by, there are still fishermen to go out. i think these people, the historical piece is a very difficult time. we barely survived when they came home and they were so hard-working. they just never gave up. the women would raise their children in a much simpler way. they have gardens and for me, it was something that
chickens. >> at your home in the strisk san francisco. >> and there are fifteen of them. and a rooster who has a name of howie. i named him after howard zimmerman who was a great friend we lost last year. i love raising them. they are great wonderful beings. >> what y are you raising chickens. what attracted you? >> they are part of my growing up. and i had lost touch with them. i needed to be back on the farm, back with farm animals that i had known as a child because i wanted to reaffirm my relationship to really the animal world. >> alice walker you have written with a what twenty books? >> thirty something. >> when people see you they immediately go to the color purple. >> yes. how do you feel about that? >> i think it's my ancestors doing. i credit my ancestors many ways with the success of the book. i did it out of a love for them. and i feel they think, she took good care of us in the book. i haven't heard any claimant from them. i think they want to take care of me by being this signal to other people that here is someone who is writing, and so i feel very happy about it because ot
to the west coast to help the folks in l.a. and san francisco and seattle to understand this. that can all be done. it has a permanent purpose, a major attraction when spring break comes and kids come from the eighth grade. i will make that decision and will be talking to you since you are my neighbor in terms of this coming fall, ringling brothers and barnum and bailey circus. >> thank whils people to do great things how looking beyond patriot, i know you and i will be working with that but could you share with others what the expectation is? >> thanks to the navy memorial nab institute and co-sponsors, is launching a weak campaign that will transition to a fall campaign which will talk to transition into a decade of honor and remembrances to this decade to. and capture diverse experiences. it is not one person's career, the most powerful thing, the most critical moments of the past ten years of the front lines. the aggressive book tour to go to universities and high schools throughout the country. and share this message. all of you here on behalf of us and advocates for this book. tonigh
and closed the door stole $1,000 and a car and drove away with his mistress and made his way to san francisco then decided high a miss my family but then left again and got the mistress pregnant again then my grandmother had a breakdown again. there has been some healing process is somebody said the name ambrose's he would leave the room. this book suddenly my father's story is out there. it is good for him. the story of forgiveness of this the, realizing when they were fighting the storm , the courage fishermen still go out to but it was a difficult time they were so hard-working. the women could raise their children so the courage and integrity that we could learn from pay it worked
, of whom i'm speaking, was a young lawyer in san francisco who was could upon to take over a corruption case against the city's mayor and some co-conspirators in a bribery scandal. he took over the case, he was second chair of the case at the outset but took over the first chair when the lead prosecutor was shot in the head in court by a dismissed juror. law students, take note. [laughter] it -- johnson made his name in that case and went on to serve as governor of california and to spearhead a singular political movement in the state's history which was the rise of the california progressives. the progressives were, by today's definitions, a bit of a hybrid, and they are sometimes also misunderstood. they were importantly not populist. it was not a pop list movement per se. they were largely middle class men, many were -- many ran small businesses. their principal target of their reform efforts was the southern pacific whose political influence they deplored and which kept them -- which shut them out of business. they loathed corruption and vice, they were quite bourgeois and moderate
'm not a navy person or engineer. but we need to go up to the west coast and help the folks in l.a. and san francisco and seattle to understand this. and that can all be done so it has a permanent purpose, especially when it's in new york, as a major attraction when the spring break comes and kids come from the eighth grade, it will just really keep this in the heart. so i make that prediction, and i'm going to be talking to you, since you're my neighbor, about this in terms of this coming fall after ringling brothers brr barnum and bailey's circus is over on november 6th. >> thank you. thank you. i gave you my business card because i know you have some existential connections with the lord, and please pray for the book this week. we gave guidance to the writers. if you had ten minutes in front of an eighth grade clarks what would you tell them? what would you tell them about leadership? what did you experience over the last ten years, and how can we use this book to inspire young people to do great things? so all of those parents and grandparents out there, this is the back of choice. for
the globe as the best book of the year and for comparable honors by amazon, quill and wire, the "san francisco chronicle" to name just a few. "half-blood blues" is esi edugyan's second novel. the second life of samuel times was named one of 2004's books to remember the new york public library. he was nominated for the hurston wright legacy award and part of cannot's canada's new fiction program. of -- parents or as they say in nigeria the naming and parents, in calgary and making her home in victoria, esi edugyan has held residencies in spain, in iceland and in germany. she is a writer who the globe and mail says promises to leave -- lead black editor not only direction i haven't agree with that. for revocation, for her invocation of the time and a place that are entrenched in our imagination through the language that they use. even as they define our imagination and for her illumination of people upon whom to little historical or literary light has been shown. esi edugyan is awarded the anisfeld-wolf book award for fiction for her stunning and startling novel, "half-blood blues." [a
choice is the best book i've been here ever comparable honors by amazon, quote choir, the "san francisco chronicle" to name just a few. "half-blood blues" a edugyan is first second novel. and one of 2004's books to remember but the public library. nominated for the personal advocacy award award and part of the not fiction program. as a fan beloved nigeria. in calgary, making her in home now and the doria, edugyan in the with residents in spain, iceland and germany. she is a writer who says promises to leave but literature and the holder's direction. and i happen to agree with that. for each location, for her either occasion of the time and place that are entrenched in our imaginations, through the language that they use, even as they defy our imagination and for her elimination of people, upon whom to little historical or literary lake has been shown. esi edugyan is awarded the anisfield-wolf award for fiction for her startling and startling novel, "half-blood blues." [applause] these back ♪ >> and so, so honored to be receiving this award tonight, to be associated with this long disti
of time with a pediatrician in san francisco who is watching how to improve environments for kids but a lot of folks also take place in schools dealing with adolescence when those qualities become character. in different ways, different educator's from a chess teacher in brooklyn to a private school principal in new york city to mentors working in the highest poverty neighborhood in chicago, trying to give students the sort of support and help they need to do better in this realm. mostly we don't quite know how to teach these francs, how to help kids improve. what i write about in this book is an experiment, new innovative ideas that might be able to help kids do better in this dimension and in the process help them do better in high school and college and life. >> i am going to follow up beach author's introduction with one quick question and get to the next topic. you wrote a book a few years ago while you were reporting for the new york times on the harlem children -- you wrote a book called however it takes, and we very aggressively pursued a promised neighborhood grant from t
tree hugging san francisco liberals, that is who we are talking about. people who are interested not just in economic outcomes but social outcomes. whereas conservatives are interested in talking about drugs and sex progressives are interested in talking about whether you can put salt in your french fries and whether you can have a plastic bag or drink a soda. michael bloomberg, great example. that is what we are talking about, that ideology of left, the progressive ideology. what are some myths commonly held by today's progressives? we have five myths but we tend to focus on the first two because those of the jews the ideas. one is that natural things are good. and unnatural things are bad. and checked science will destroy us. science is only relative anyway and science is on our side. the first one -- we won't have much time to get into these. if you want to get my book you will learn all about them. we will talk mostly about the most famous progressive today, president barack obama. his resume when it comes to science. to give you an idea why these myths are important. natural
active, a san francisco writer who wrote tales of the city. these are the living writers that i write about. >> are we post the writers yet? >> good question. not quite yet. i think people would like it to be. it is still a subject that makes most readers uncomfortable. all of these gay characters. but people are still uncomfortable about it in books. i'm not sure why. maybe it's a book that's literally in her face. it is a little too unnerving. where it is easier where someone is on the stage or on tv. so it hasn't quite, we are not completely assimilated but maybe that's a good thing. it's good to be a little different to mix things up. and we are still mixing things up. so we still have the writers and we have african american writers, we still have women authors. which is a good thing. people have to acknowledge that even though it is an african-american writer, anybody can read them. they are telling stories that should interest anyone. they need to escape the idea of leaders that only gays would want to read about days or only african-americans who want to read about african-ame
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